GAP YEAR / SEMESTER & ROWING

PROGRAM STRUCTURE AND REQUIREMENTS
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS       
ACADEMIC CREDIT
ROWING PROGRAM
PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
PROGRAM DATES AND COSTS
INSURANCE                                  
ACCOMMODATION                

CONTACT US         

 

PROGRAM STRUCTURE AND REQUIREMENTS      

This program allows high school graduates to take a year or semester abroad taking an intensive Spanish language course (beginning, intermediate or advanced levels) at SAIIE or taking a serious of courses at the University of Sevilla, and continue to practice rowing weekly on a Spanish team under the guidance of a Spanish Olimpyc Rowing Coach.

We offer two programs to our students:

University of Seville: Liberal Arts, Business, Spanish Lang. & Culture Program
SAIIE: Intensive Spanish Language Program

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS   

  • Must be a high school graduate at the time of application.
  • In the 2k Concept Rowing Ergometer test female student-athletes cannot exceed 8:20 and male student-athletes 7:10. 
  • No previous knowledge of Spanish required
  • A student must be in good academic standing at the time of participation.
  • Students participating at the University of Seville program must take between a minimum of 3 and a maximum of 5 courses per semester. Each course consists of 45 class hours.
  • A student must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 GPA*
  • Completed SAIIE application
  • One letter of recommendation 
  • Official transcript, most recent grade report, or high school diploma 
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with student visa

*If your GPA is below 2.5, you are not automatically disqualified from studying abroad.

Please contact SAIIE for more information.

To learn more about the city of Seville and why chose this destination to do your GAP YEAR abroad please visit our website at: http://www.saiie.com/the-school/seville-capital 

 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

University of Seville: Liberal Arts
, Business, Spanish Lang. & Culture Program

This program is designed for students from begginning to advanced level of Spanish. Students will take classes at the University of Seville.

Students may choose between the following, amongst other various subjects:

  • SPANISH LITERATURE COURSES

  • SPANISH CULTURE COURSES 

  • BUSINESS COURSES
  • ART COURSES

  • HISTORY AND ANTHROPOLOGY RELATED TO SPAIN, EUROPE AND LATIN AMERICA COURSES

  course-list

Please note:

  • To participate in the program through the University of Seville students must be 18 years old at the time of participation.

  • Classes are taught from Monday to Thursday, usually on alternating days (Monday-Wednesday or Tuesday-Thursday) and 2 hours per session.

  • Classes will be taught at the University of Seville’s main building . The University of Seville are located in the historical centre of Seville, approximately 15 minutes walk away.

 At the end of the program the student will receive a transcript from the University of Seville with the courses taken.



SAIIE: Intensive Spanish Language Program


This program takes place at the SAIIE center. 

Hours per week: 20hrs 
Classes: Monday - Friday 
Language levels: A placement exam is administered upon arrival to determine the student's Spanish level. Classes are offered at beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels. 
Courses: Spanish language classes will be held in the mornings from Mo - Fri (4 hrs per day)

At the end of the course the student will receive an official certification from SAIIE acknowledging the hours taken by the student.


 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

It is the students responsibility to obtain credit for the course taken at SAIIE and the University of Seville. 

 

 

ROWING PROGRAM


The Students on this rowing camp will join a Spanish rowing (Club Naútico Sevilla) team with whom they will row throughout the year or semester with.

Students participating on this program will have the option of rowing anywhere from 3-5 times per week, giving them the option to participate on cultural activities and weekend trips.

David Cifuentes, head Coach for Club Naútico's rowing team, is one of the coaches for the under 23 Spanish national team.

 

Where will you row?

At SAIIE, we work with the well-renowned local rowing club at Club Naútico Sevilla to help student rowers perfect their skills. 

SAIIE students on our Rowing program will be surrounded and integrated in a group of roughly 60 Spanish rowers from juniors to professionals and veterans. They form a varied and extensive network of athletes, making every training session and event a new and exciting learning experience. This has been the basis of the Rowing section´s successful growth within the Club over the 57 years since it was founded.

In its list of sporting achievements is the distinguished Stadium Cup (Copa Stadium), and the 1985 National Sports Award (Premio Nacional de Deportes), which was awarded to the Club for its special contribution to the development of its club sports.

Many rowers from the Club have participated in the Olympics. Here is a list of the names of past Club Nautico Sevilla´s Olympians:

  • Rome 1960: José Antonio Sahuquillo, Enrique Castelló, Joaquín Real.
  • Los Angeles 1984: Fernando Climent (Silver Medal).
  • Seoul 1988: Fernando Climent, Enrique Briones.
  • Barcelona 1992: Fernando Climent, José María de Marco, Fernando Molina, Enrique Briones.
  • Atlanta 1996: Fernando Climent, José Mª de Marco (Diploma), Alfredo Girón, Juan Manuel Florido, Esperanza Márquez.
  • Athens 2004: Juan Manuel Florido.
  • Beijing 2008: Camila Vargas.

Some of the Rowing team´s major milestones include 1 Olympic Silver medal at the hands of the current president of the Spanish Rowing Federation (FER), Mr. Fernando Climent, as well as 11 Gold, 11 Silver, and 21 Bronze medals in World Championships. In Spanish Championships they have won 596 medals (203 Gold, 197 Silver, and 196 Bronze). In the 2011-2012 season, Club Náutico Sevilla was ranked in first position in the national ranking of rowing clubs by the Spanish Rowing Federation.

 

 Meet the Head Coach

davidcifuentes

David Cifuentes is the head rowing coach for the senior team at Club Nautico. Not only is he the coach of the senior team but he oversees all other rowing teams in the club as well. In addition to his crucial role at Club Nautico, Cifuentes coaches Spain’s National Under 23 Rowing team. Previously an international rower himself, he rowed 25 times for Spain on the national team and his history of accomplishments showcase a bronze metal from the world cup in the under 23 level. He has vast experience in the rowing world. He started rowing at the age of 13 until 34 during which time he has competed in several world championships and Spanish national championships. Many rowers under his swing have competed in world and national championships. Ex. Álvaro Romero was second in the world junior champinship or Javier García and Jaime Canalejo who ended up 5th in the under 23 world championship



Rowing Program Requirements

  • In the 2k Concept Rowing Ergometer test female student-athletes cannot exceed 8:20 and male student-athletes 7:10.

If you exceed these times, please contact the Program Manager, Mr. Sean Chipres at seanrc@saiie.com

 

PHOTO GALLERY

 

FAQ's 

For more information about the rowing program we offer to our students in Seville please read the following interview with the student Austin Letorney from Hobart and William Smith Colleges. 

Please click here

How do you find the trainings in comparison to back home at Club Nautico?
The training is very different. Usually my team at home trains 2-3 times a day and all the guys are there. The training here is a lot in a little amount of time which is good. Even though there is one practice a day, the coaches pack a lot into them.

Do you find them at a good level?
Yes. The lifts are tough, but you definitely see improvements. The rowing is a great base fitness builder and the team is technically very good.

How would the level compare to an average college team in the US?
The level is different. To compete as a top 20 program in the U.S., it takes a couple practices a day. Here, it is just different style of doing things and it works for them. It doesn’t mean one is better than the other. The two countries just have a different way of doing things.

In the US, you are used to only rowing in a boat with 8 people, right?
Typically, the U.S. races in eights. However, for trainings purposes, a lot of high caliber programs train in pairs (two people) and fours. Racing in these boats occur as well, but usually not during the racing year.

At Club Nautico you row in all boats, correct?
Yes, at Club Naútico we row all kinds of boats, sculling (with two oars) and sweeping (with one).

Do you find it useful that you have to row all styles or boats here?
Yes, it is very useful to row all kinds of boats because for the eights, fours, and pairs, it keeps me in boats that I row at school. For doubles and quads (two oared boats), it gives me a change of pace and I can row something I traditionally do not row.

What type of exercises do you do on the river while your rowing?
Usually on the river we just row to where David, the coach, tell us. David will also tell us to do drills at certain points on the river which include anything from body prep drills, to rowing on the square, to pause drills.

What about the coaching? Does David give instructions? Has he helped you?
David is a very good coach in my opinion. He has a lot of boats on the river at once so he is bouncing around from boat to boat, but he will watch you for a little, give you some things to work on, and then he will tend to another boat. In the U.S. I am used to my coach staying with us the whole practice. No one way is better, just different.

You do weights. How often (Days and hours)? Have you found these trainings useful? Do you find the weight training organized?
Usually we do weights two times a week as the practice. These are very useful lifts and I have seen major improvements with my strength. It can be a little crowded in the gym, but the lifts are organized and David has groups and separate workouts for each group.

What about the rowing machines, do you do any type of exercises or tests?
We have used the rowing machines a little bit. Some hard workouts here and there and a couple test, but definitely not as many as my team at home

You only use the rowing machines on weight days?
Machines differ depending on what the workout is and on what day David wants to use the machines.

How about running? Is running part of your trainings as well? If so, how often do you run? For how long?
Running is usually for warmups on the days before lifts to get warmed up. Usually it is a short run before practice to get the muscles warm, but there is no extensive running done.

 

  

 

 

PROGRAM ACTIVITIES 

 

CULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

Throughout the term, the school will organize activities in the evening.

Some of these activities will have to be done in group fostering communication and team orientation, which will be very beneficial for the student’s future career. During the term the Student Affairs office will be posting information on our social media about the different opportunities we will be offering our students.



TRIPS

We are very flexible with all the activities and will change them to meet the needs of our students.

Some of these trips could include the following:

Day trips:

Ronda

 Ronda 2ronda 4


As one of the oldest towns in Spain you'll find history around every corner in Ronda. There are traces of Ronda's origins from the Neolithic age, through the era of the Romans, the Arab age and the conquest of the ancient city by the Catholic Monarchs in 1485 through to the 19th century when Ronda was best known for the banditry in the surrounding hills and the origins of bullfighting in the Ronda bullring which still stands.

Click here  to view more photos of Ronda!

 

 

 

Aracena

 

 

Aracena is a small town located in the province of Huelva. The historic quarter, declared a Cultural Object, and the grotto of Maravillas are the main attractions.

The first thing we see as we approach the town, is an Almohad tower that bore for almost two hundred years the standard of the Templar Knights. The city centre has numerous interesting monuments, such as the castle and church of the Templar Knigths, from the 13th and 14th centuries; the Renaissance church of Asunción, from the 16th century; the old City Hall, a medieval building with a 16th-century main front; and the Gothic church of Nuestra Señora del Mayor Dolor, from the 13th and 15th centuries, the oldest in Aracena. However, the most interesting of all is the grotto of Maravillas, with beautiful stalactites and stalagmites, which at 1,500 metres is one of the longest caves in Spain. Inside the grotto we find twelve halls and six lakes.

Córdoba

 

 

In Roman times, Córdoba had more cultural buildings than Rome. It was the capital of the province of Hispania Baetica. Remains of the Roman Temple built by Claudius Marcellus, the Roman Bridge and other Roman remains can still be seen around the city.

Córdoba was conquered by the Moors in 711, and Moorish influence can still be felt in the city. During the time of Islamic rule, Córdoba was the largest city and embodied the most sophisticated culture and the most developed bureaucracy in Europe.

The most important monument in the city is the former Mosque (the 3rd largest mosque in the world), known by its Spanish name, Mezquita. After the conquest, the Christians built a cathedral in the middle of this large complex, so it is now two sacred sites in one.

Córdoba was recovered from Muslim invaders by Christian forces as part of the Reconquista in 1236, and became a centre of activity against the remaining Islamic population. Surviving Renaissance monuments in Córdoba include the Palacio de Viana, the city's Ducal Palace.

Click here to view more photos of Córdoba!

Gibraltar

 Gibraltar3

 

Located in the most Southern point of Spain, the rock of Gibraltar occupies a strategic position at the eastern entrance to the narrow straight and guards the only exit from the Mediterranean to the wide ocean beyond. Gibraltar has been in the historical limelight for over 3,000 years.

It was during the capture of Gibraltar by the Castillians (1309-1333) that the streets of the lower town were constructed and Gibraltar became a substancial city.

Gibraltar became a British garrison in 1830 (During the War of the Spanish Succession) and was declared a colony. Since then Britain and Spain have have had many disputes over the territory.

Among its many tourist attractions one of the main ones is to visit the monkeys on the rock. Nobody knows how the famous tailless Macaques came to be on the Rock.

Click here  to view more photos of Gibraltar!

 

Itálica and Archeological Museum

 

Itálica


Founded by General Publius Cornelius Scipio (he was later known as Scipio Africanus) in 206 BC next to a Turdentian settlement, 7 kilometers from Seville, It demonstrates wonderful examples of Roman architecture, mosaic work and city layouts. Italica was one of the first Roman towns in Spain. Called Italica in remembrance of Italy. Originally it was simply a hospital and a small military base designed to house the wounded veterans of the war with the Carthaginians led by Hannibal and was built after the battle of Ilipa (Alcala del Rio), but it soon developed into an important port and in the first century AD give birth first to Trajan and then Hadrian (though some accounts say Trajan was really born in Rome). Hadrian took particular pride in his native town and embellished it with many of the buildings that are to be seen today.

Archeological Museum

One of the best museums of its kind in Spain, located in the Maria Luisa Park and originally built as part of the 1929 exhibition. The focus is on the Romans, but there is also a prehistorical section which includes the Stone Age, Bronze Age and Iron Age. Later, the Phoenicians, the Greeks and the Carthaginians all traded and settled in what is now the province of Seville.

Be sure not to miss the Carambolo Treasure located in the section of the Phoenician colonisation. In 1958, workmen digging foundations for a new sports club found twenty one pieces of gold jewellery, including a necklace, bracelets and pieces from a crown dating from the 6th century. In the design, there are clear connections with the Orient, raising questions about who these people were who were the inhabitants of Andalucia all those thousands of years ago.

The basement here houses Paleothic artifacts and items, such as copies of the remarkable Tartessian Carambolo treasures. This hoard of 6th century BC gold jewellery was discovered near Seville in 1958.

The main galleries are upstairs and are devoted to the Roman era with statues and fragments rescued from the nearby ancient site of Italica. Highlights include a third century BC mosaic from Ecija and sculptures of local born emperors, Trajan and Hadrian. The rooms continue to Moorish Spain via Palaeo-Christian sarucophagi. Visigothic relics and artifacts discovered at Medina Azahara.

Click here  to view more photos of Itálica and click here  for Archeological Museum! 

Jerez

 

 

Spend the day in a unique town where we will take you to the one of the most famous wineries we have in Spain, González Byass. Learn the process of how they make sherry wine and its history.

González Byass is one of Spain's most well-known sherry bodega. Its origins can be traced to 1835 when the business was started by Manuel María González Angel, who was subsequently joined by his English agent, Robert Blake Byass. The González family assumed sole control of the business in 1988. The firm produces the world known sherry Tío Pepe.

Not only was the Gonzalez family at the forefront of sherry winemaking, they’ve also participated in the introduction of the polo game in Spain, the first grass tennis court, the installation of the first electric lighting and running water in the plant, the first train project in Spain as well as numerous other industrial and cultural innovations.

 

Cádiz (Beach trip)

 

 

Cádiz is the oldest continuously-inhabited city in Spain and one of the oldest in southwestern Europe. The “Tacita de Plata” was founded in 1100 B.C. by the Phoenicians, a seafaring people who turned Gadir into an important trading colony where the Carthaginians, the Romans, the Visigoths and the Muslims would all subsequently settle. An open, cosmopolitan city, it sport was chosen by Columbus as the point of departure for his second voyage to the New World. The city would then become, after the decline of Seville, the port to The Indies, drawing the flow of trade with the American Continent. This frantic commercial activity then brought about an era of economic, cultural splendour, when Baroque palaces with their characteristic towers offering amazing views were built.

Havana is Cadiz! A stroll along the Cadiz sea front, from La Caleta to the Campo del Sur, will remind the visitor of the image of the avenue the Malecón in Havana, as there are many similarities between Cadiz and Latin American cities, thanks to the constant flow of people travelling between Cadiz and the New World. The cathedral in Cadiz is a good example of this influence, as are several of the manor houses and the towers with their views which grew up in the midst of old Cadiz’s cityscape during the expansion into America.

Weekend Trips: 

Madrid

 

The capital of Spain, located in the heart of the Iberian Peninsula and right in the center of the country, with a population of over three million people, and the home of the Spanish Royal Family.

Madrid, originally called Mayrit, was founded by the emir of Córdoba Muhammad at the end of the 9th century. During the Reconquest of Spain by the Christians, Madrid passed from Muslim to Christian hands several times, it was the origin of the mixture of cultures which characterizes the city still today.

The present location of Madrid, in the centre of Spain, was established by the king Alfonso I in 1083. 

What remains today of the distant past are mainly Baroque and Neoclassical structures, and buildings of the 17th and 18th centuries, such as “Plaza Mayor”and “Palacio Real"

Lisbon

ronda-2013

 

The capital of Portugal since its conquest from the Moors in 1147, Lisbon is a legendary city with over 20 centuries of History. The Alfama is one of the oldest quarters in Lisbon.

Once the launch pad for many of the voyages of discovery (notablyVasco da Gama's epic journey to India), Lisbon was the first true world city, the capital of an empire spreading over all continents, from South America (Brazil) to Asia (Macao, China; Goa, India). It is forever known as the city of the explorers

 

Morocco

   

 

In Morocco, we will be visiting the cities of Tangier, Asilah, and Chefchaouen.

Tangier is a city in northern Morocco. It lies on the North African coast at the western entrance to the Strait of Gibraltar where the Mediterranean meets the Atlantic Ocean of Cape Spartel.

Asilah is a fortified town on the northwest tip of the Atlantic coast of Morocco. Its ramparts and gateworks remain fully intact. Its history dates back to 1500 B.C., when the Phoenicians used it as a base for trade. This town has been occupied since than by the Portuguese (1471), the Spaniards (1912), and now the Morrocans.

Chefchaouen is a city in northwest Morocco. It is the chief twon of the province of the same name, and is noted for its buildings in shades of blue. The city was founded in 1471, as a small fortress which still exists to this day, by Moorish exiles from Spain to fight the Portuguese invasions of northern Morocco. In 1920, the Spanish seized Chefchaouen. Spain returned the city after the independence of Morocco in 1956

Granada

Granada is situated in the eastern part of the region of Andalusia. Its unique history has bestowed it with an artistic grandeur embracing Moorish palaces and Christian Renaissance treasures. As the last Moorish capital on the Iberian Peninsula, it also holds great symbolic value.

The Alhambra, a Moorish citadel and palace, is in Granada. It is the most renowned building of the Andalusian Islamic historical legacy with its many cultural attractions that make Granada a popular destination among the touristic cities of Spain.

The Almohad influence on architecture is preserved in the area of the city called the Albaicin with its fine examples of Moorish and Morisco construction.

Granada is also well known for the Sierra Nevada Mountains where you can ski. This is Europe’s most southerly ski resort and it is small in comparison to other European resorts.

 

Lagos

 

 

Lagos is located in Southern Portugal in the region of Algarve and has some of the most beautiful beaches in Europe. This will be a great ooprtunitty to spend a relaxing weekend on the beach. The area offers many exciting activities such as surfing, biking, sailing, etc…

 

 

   

        

 

 

PROGRAM DATES AND COSTS

Academic Year 2022 / 23

Fall Program Dates: September 10, 2022 - December 15, 2022 
Spring Program Dates: February 5, 2023 – May 12, 2023 

September 10: Depart de United States
September 11: Arrive in Seville, Spain
September 12: Orientation and welcome dinner
September 13 - 16: Orientation week
September 19: Classes begin at SAIIE & U.S. (Universidad de Sevilla)
September 19: Rowing practices start
September 23: Included beach day trip
September 28: SAIIE quiz I
October 7: Included Itálica (Roman city) day trip
October 10: SAIIE First Exams 
October 12: Spanish holiday
October 14: Included Ronda day trip
Ocotber 18 & 19: Partial U.S. Exams
October 28 & 29 : Weekend trip to Granada
November 1: Spanish Holiday
November: SAIIE quiz 2
November 4: Córdoba day trip
November 14: SAIIE Second Exams 
November 18 & 19: Optional Weekend trip (TBD)
December 5 - 8: Spanish Holiday
December 12 & 13: U.S. Final Exams
December 14: SAIIE Final Exam
December 14: Farewell dinner
December 15 : End of term, Accommodation Checkout, and First Day to Leave
December  – January : Spanish Holidays (Christmas break)
Feb.  5: Check in back to Spanish home
Feb.  6: Classes Begin at SAIIE, and swimming practice
Feb.  15: SAIIE quiz 1
Feb.  16: SAIIE quiz 1
Feb.  17: SAIIE last day to add or change classes
Feb.  24 & 25: Included Granada weekend trip
Feb.  27: SAIIE First Exams
Feb.  28: Spanish holiday
Mar.  1: SAIIE First Exams
Mar.  2: SAIIE First Exams
Mar.  3: Included Córdoba day trip
Mar.  15 & 16: Partial U.S. (Unievrsidad de Sevilla) Exams
Mar.  17 &18: Optional weekend trip (TBD)
Mar.  20: SAIIE quiz 2
Mar.  21: SAIIE quiz 2
Mar.  29 & 30: SAIIE Second Exams
Mar.  31: Included Ronda day trip
Apr.  3 - 7: Spanish holidays
Apr.  14 & 15: Optional weekend trip (TBD)
Apr.  24 - 28: Spanish holiday 
May  1: Spanish holiday
May  5: Included Itálica day trip
May  8 & 9: SAIIE Final Exams
May 10 & 11: Final Exams at U.S.
May  11: Farewell dinner
May  12: End of term, Accommodation Checkout by noon, and First Day to Leave

 

Program Cost

INTENSIVE SPANISH LANGUAGE PROGRAM: 
$23,950 (Academic year) / $12,595 (semester)

UNIVERSITY OF SEVILLE PROGRAM: 
$24,950 (Academic year) $12,995 (semester)


Program costs includes:

  • SAIIE full-time fees and support services before, during, and after the program
  • Airport reception and on-site orientation
  • On site bilingual staff on call 24/7 throughout the program
  • Accommodation in a Spanish home with most meals (breakfast and mid-day meals Monday through Friday and evening meals Sunday through Thursday) and one load of laundry per week throughout the program. 
  • Program excursions and activities (Granada weekend excursion, as well as, Cordoba, Ronda, and Italica day excursion). 
  • Cultural visits to the Cathedral, Alcazar Palace and Barrio de Santa Cruz (Old Jewish Quarter) – include an English tour guide.
  • Welcome and Farewell meals.
  • Spanish Language program fees that includes classes from Mo-Fri (20hrs per week) or University of Seville program fees.
  • Rowing program fees. Practices from Mo-Friday (2hrs per day) throughout the year/term.
    Please note: Team practices 5 times per week but our students can choose to practice from 3-5 times per week.
  • SAIIE Transcript at the end of the course certifying the Spanish language course taken. University of Seville Transcript if participating in their program.

Fall 2022/Spring 2023 Out-of-Pocket Costs Include:

  • U.S. Passport ($135)
  • Mandatory CISI health and medical evacuation insurance (https://www.culturalinsurance.com/)
  • Spanish Visa (estimated at $160)
  • Airfare (estimated at $1,000)
  • Meals not included with accommodation (estimated at $700)
  • Mandatory International Student Identification Card (ISIC) ($25) – (https://www.isic.org/)
  • Transportation to practice (estimated at $300 per semester)
  • Optional excursions and activities (estimated at $400 per semester)

 

  

 

APPLICATION DEADLINES 

TERM ABROAD   APPLICATION CYCLE OPENS           APPLICATION DEADLINE         
Fall 2022 October 1 April 15, 2022
Spring 2023 April 1 October 15, 2022
Academic Year 2022/23 October 1 April 15

Missed the deadline? Please contact Mr. Sean Chipres  to enquire about late application options. 



INSURANCE 

Students have to get a health and medical evacuation insurance and we recommend all of our students this company (CISI): https://www.culturalinsurance.com/#cultural-insurance 



 

ACCOMMODATION

 

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CONTACT US 

For more information on the program please contact the Program Manager, Mr. Sean Chipres, at seanrc@saiie.com